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Nebraska Youth Suicide Prevention

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If you need immediate help, call
1-800-273-TALK.

Suicide Prevention Initiative

The Nebraska Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative is working to decrease the suicide rate among young people in Nebraska. To learn more about us and about the efforts funded in Nebraska through the Garret Lee Smith Memorial Act, visit our about page.  

Learn About Suicide Prevention

Learn about what you can do to spot the warning signs of suicide, refer individuals to an adult or professional, and raise awareness in others.

Training & Education

Several educational opportunities are available across the state of Nebraska for students, individuals, schools, and practitioners. 

Our Partners

It takes a collaborated effort to prevent youth suicide. Learn about some of the organizations and individuals involved in this effort.

The foundational belief of Zero Suicide is that suicide deaths for individuals under the care of health and behavioral health systems are preventable. For systems dedicated to improving patient safety, Zero Suicide presents an aspirational challenge and practical framework for system-wide transformation toward safer suicide care.


Learn More about Zero Suicide.

Join the Effort

Between the State Suicide Prevention Coalitionlocal coalitions, and educational opportunities, there are lots of ways to get involved.

Thank you for reaching out to Nebraska Youth Suicide Prevention! If you need immediate assistance, The Lifeline provides 24/7 free and confidential support at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Don’t hesitate to call, your life matters to us.

Get in Touch

This was developed under a grant number 1U79SM061741-01 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) via the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health. The views, policies, and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of SAMHSA or HHS.

© Copyright 2019 University of Nebraska Public Policy Center